Philadelphia Veterans Day Parade 2015

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Veterans Day is an official United States public holiday, observed annually on November, that honors military veterans, that is, persons who served in the United States Armed Forces. Philadelphia hosted first ever Veteran’s Day Parade. Many people in the city have long awaited a parade to honor their veterans. The parade focused on veterans throughout history as well as commemorating the 70th anniversary of the end of World War II, the 50th anniversary of Vietnam and the 25th anniversary of Desert Shield. The parade incorporated veterans groups and organizations from Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Delaware.

veterans day Philadelphia Veterans Day Parade 2015

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Weird Mütter Museum

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The Mütter Museum was founded in 1858, when Dr. Thomas Dent Mütter donated a collection of medical anomalies, anatomical and pathological specimens, and bizarre medical instruments to the museum. Its original purpose was to continue medical education and research in the heart of Philadelphia, located inside the headquarters of the College of Physicians of Philadelphia. Inside the Museum, you’ll find a wide smattering of abnormal body parts preserved in fluid. You’ll encounter skeletal formations — like that of a 7’6” man — that don’t seem quite possible. Diseased and enlarged organs are tastefully displayed within glass-encased oak frames. For the sake of comparison, illustrations of normal anatomical formations are cast in wax, plaster and papier mâché throughout the museum. Photography is not allowed in the Mütter.

Museum Hours:
Daily 10AM – 5PM
Closed Thanksgiving, December 24, December 25, January 1

Museum Admission:
Adult $16
Military with ID $13
Senior 65 Years and up $14
Students with ID $11
Youth (6-17) $11
Child (5 and Under) Free

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Eastern State Penitentiary, Philadelphia

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Eastern State Penitentiary was the largest building in America when it opened in 1829. Its grounds still cover a dozen acres; its 30-foot-high walls extend for nearly a mile. It was America’s first penitentiary. Designed to inspire penitence in the heart of convicts, Some of America’s most notorious criminals were held in Eastern’s cells. When gangster Al Capone found himself in front of a judge for the first time in 1929, he was sentenced to one year in prison. He spent most of that sentence in relative comfort at Eastern State, where he was allowed to furnish his cell with antiques, rugs, and oil paintings. Bank robber Willie Sutton joined eleven other men in a doomed 1945 tunnel escape. By the 1960′s, the aged prison was in need of costly repairs. The Commonwealth closed the facility in 1971, 142 years after it admitted Charles Williams, Prisoner Number One. The City of Philadelphia purchased the site in 1980, intending to reuse or develop it. In 1988, with the prison site threatened with inappropriate reuse proposals, the Eastern State Penitentiary Task Force successfully petitioned Mayor Wilson Goode to halt redevelopment. The Pennsylvania Prison Society opened the Penitentiary for the first season of regular guided interpretative tours in 1994.

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Cell ward

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Bottom floor

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Death Row Yard with Cell Block 11 decay

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Operating Room

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Medical Ward

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Split hallway

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Hallway of Decay

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The Chair

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Bathroom

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Wooden cell doors

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Cell ward

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Cell

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Artist installation

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Cell

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Al’s Cell

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Cell Blocks

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Entrance

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How Did the Liberty Bell Crack

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The Liberty Bell is a bronze bell that symbolizes freedom in the United States of America. This historic bell is located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. The Liberty Bell was originally ordered by the Assembly of the colony of Pennsylvania from a foundry in England. When the bell arrived from England in 1752 and was hung in the State House in Philadelphia.  It was called the State House Bell. The first time that the new bell was struck, it cracked. After cracking, the bell was recast twice in 1753 in Philadelphia by John Pass and John Stow.  The restored bell was probably rung at the first public reading of the Declaration of Independence in Philadelphia (on July 8, 1776). It rang to announce many important events in early American history. The bell cracked again on July 8, 1835, while being rung at the funeral of John Marshall, the fourth Chief Justice of the Supreme Court and one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence.

The inscription around the top of the Liberty Bell reads as follows:
PROCLAIM LIBERTY THROUGHOUT ALL THE LAND UNTO ALL THE INHABITANTS THEREOF LEV. XXV X. BY ORDER OF THE ASSEMBLY OF THE PROVINCE OF PENSYLVANIA FOR THE STATE HOUSE IN PHILADA
PASS AND STOW
PHILADA
MDCCLIII

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